Category Archives: Social Responsibilty

How psychology can show how to improve society.

‘Cause everybody cries, and everybody hurts, sometimes…….

Compassion: if dogs can do it, then so can we.

Compassion: if dogs can do it, then so can we.

So here is a quick rant, and I’d be intrigued what people think of the message. I read yesterday, in The Times, that the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), out in May, has removed grief as an exclusion criteria for a diagnosis of depression. So now, in the US, grieving over the loss of a loved one can be diagnosed as being mentally ill.

Come on!! Seriously!? It’s not a term that we like use in the field of psychology, but this just seems freakin’ nuts!! I’m happy to say that the academic, medical and therapeutic fields have all expressed their outrage at this declassification of ‘grief’ and are proposing a boycott of the new edition until it is revised accordingly.

But I’m not here to fuel a boycott. I don’t care for that kind of tactic myself, and prefer to use education as my tool.

Grieving is natural process, people! It doesn’t make you mentally ill if you cry because someone you love has been taken from you. That’s just being human! I would be greatly concerned if you didn’t feel something at all, maybe then that might ring some alarm bells.

It’s OK to feel sad sometimes. Sometimes it’s appropriate. But there is no reason to feel ashamed or think that there is something wrong with feeling that way at the right moment. It can be extremely cathartic to scream and cry. Just something to keep in mind.

I leave you with the words of Ms Jessie J:

It’s okay not to be okay.

As usual, comments are welcome and encouraged.

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Is there anybody going to listen to my story…..

You'd scream too if someone blasted a megaphone in your ear.

You’d scream too if someone blasted a megaphone in your ear.

Carrying on from my last post about the ‘Time to Change’ campaign, and how talking about mental health is important, I keep having flashbacks to an old series of TV ads for BT with Bob Hoskins and the tagline, ‘It’s good to talk’. Pretty good ad campaign if I still remember it after 20 years.

I’ll be first to admit that communication is important in any relationship, and holding in feelings can lead to both physical and mental health repercussions. However, while we place so much stock in talking, I think we sometimes lose sight of the art that is listening. Continue reading

Oh brother I can’t, I can’t get through, I’ve been trying hard to reach you ’cause I don’t know what to do…

Talking: A conversation only needs one word to begin.

Talking: A conversation only needs one word to begin.

I’ve been driving a lot recently, which means I’ve been listening to the radio more than usual. I keep coming across the same advert with the following tagline:

You don’t have to be an expert to talk about mental health. Continue reading

I sat on the roof and kicked off the moss, well a few of the verses well they’ve got me quite cross….

Lyrics: Sometimes they say what we mean better than our own speech.

Lyrics: Sometimes they say what we mean better than our own speech.

So some of you may have noticed that the titles for my posts are all lyrics from songs, or variations thereof. One of the reasons is that I couldn’t think of snappy titles and so I figured lyrics would encapsulate meaning much more efficiently. Kind of difficult to improve on. But there is a psychological reason behind it too, and as my blog is all about psychology, it felt appropriate to explain the method to my madness. Continue reading

Slow down, you move too fast. You got to make the morning last…..

Impatience: proving the virtuosity of patience since time began.

Impatience: proving the virtuosity of patience since time began.

Occasionally I take part in market research for a bit of extra cash. Recently I was part of a group answering questions about personal technology use for an internet-based company that shall remain nameless as I don’t want a sniper pointing at my bedroom window while I write this. One particular question stuck in my head:

How has technology changed the way you do things?

And my answer:

It has made me more impatient.

Continue reading

Don’t blame it on the sunshine, don’t blame it on the moonlight, don’t blame it on the good times, blame it on the PARENTS!??

Parents: beings with the ability to both make you and mortify you, all within a New York minute.

Parents: beings with the ability to both make you and mortify you, all within a New York minute.

It was Philip Larkin who said: “They f*ck you up, your mum and dad”. Some would say that pretty much sums it all up. However, the influence of the parent on a child’s development has been a point of interest for a multitude of people, including myself. Within religious texts, the relationship between child and parent, both maternal and paternal, is the focal point for many of the tales recounted, providing moral lessons to those that follow them. And I’m pretty sure you could still walk down the street and hear two lovely elderly ladies sitting on a bench at a bus stop commenting on the behaviour of the rambunctious child playing while they all wait for the same bus, saying: “It’s the parents’ fault”. But are parents really to blame? If there is a problem with child development in this country- scratch that, if there is a problem with child development in the whole world, where is the intervention needed? Rather than just playing the blame game, shouldn’t we be looking for a way to ameliorate our current situation? Continue reading